Visit NASA’s Destination Station, Hear From an Astronaut

Space Station Over Earth
Photo courtesy of NASA
The International Space Station

Do you remember the first time you touched a moon rock? Did you feel a sense of wonder about the universe that fueled your imagination? Now your children can gain that experience, too, when NASA’s Destination Station visits the Triangle.

A free traveling multimedia exhibit, NASA’s Destination Station tells the story of NASA and the International Space Station and features a touchable moon rock that returned to Earth by the Apollo 17 mission in 1972. The exhibit will be at two locations this week:

Inside NASA's Destination Station photo courtesy of NASA

Chapel Hill
On Tuesday, May 3, 1-6 p.m., NASA’s Destination Station will be in the parking area in front of Morehead Planetarium and Science Center at 250 E. Franklin St. on the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill campus. Learn more.

Raleigh
On Friday, May 6, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., NASA Destination trailer, will be parked in front of the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, just outside the giant globe of the museum’s Nature Research Center at 121 West Jones St. in downtown Raleigh. Learn more.

Inside the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences on May 6, visitors can hear from two experts in outer space:

  • Astronaut Rex Walheim will cover the experiences that led him from the Air Force to flying on the last ever shuttle mission in his talk “An Astronaut’s Perspective: Life 240 Miles above the Earth” at 12:30 p.m. and 1:30 p.m. Currently chief of the Exploration Branch of the Astronaut Office, Walheim works as the astronaut representative to the Orion Program.
  • Debbie Wells will explore how the International Space Station works to improve life on Earth during her presentation, “Off the Earth, For the Earth: How the International Space Station Improves Everyday Life” at 1 and 2 p.m. Wells is Flight Experiments Project Manager at the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space. She will explain how she helps design scientific experiments that will work in outer space. She also trains astronauts how to run these experiments and finds a way to preserve specimens before they return to Earth's gravity. 

NASA Astronaut Rex Walheim photo courtesy of NASA

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