Case of Measles Confirmed in Wake County

Shutterstock 506683222
Photo by Jarun Ontakrai/Shutterstock.com

On June 16, 2018, Wake County received confirmation of one case of measles in Wake County. The patient showed symptoms of the disease after returning from international travel.

People who have received two doses of the vaccine for measles as recommended and individuals born before 1957 are considered protected from the virus for life. For people who have not been immunized, the disease is highly contagious.

People may have been exposed to measles at the following locations, dates and times:

  • WakeMed Physician Practices in the WakeMed Garner Healthplex. Friday, June 8 from 11 a.m. through 3 p.m.
  • WakeMed Raleigh Campus: Children’s Emergency Department, Adult Emergency Department (D-Bay), Chest Pain Unit and Imaging. Friday, June 8 from 11 p.m. through Saturday, June 9 at 7 a.m.
  • WakeMed Raleigh Campus: Children’s Emergency Department, Adult Emergency Department (D-Bay), Chest Pain Unit and Imaging. mSunday, June 10 from 8:30 p.m. through Monday, June 11 at 3 a.m.
  • WakeMed Physician Practices in the WakeMed Garner Healthplex. Monday, June 11 from 1 p.m. through 5:30 p.m.
  • Duke University Hospital Emergency Department, Durham. Wednesday, June 13 from 3:30 p.m. through Thursday, June 14 at 1 a.m.

If you have NOT been vaccinated against measles AND were at one of these locations during the time frames listed above, call the North Carolina Communicable Disease Branch at 919-733-3419 or your doctor right away.

Do not show up at the hospital or a doctor’s office without calling first to avoid putting other patients or medical staff at risk. Your doctor can help determine if you are immune or make special arrangements to evaluate you if you are sick.

Measles is a highly contagious disease that is spread through the air when an infected person coughs or sneezes. Symptoms begin with a fever, cough, runny nose and red, watery eyes. These symptoms are followed by a rash that typically appears first on the face, along the hairline or behind the ears, and then spreads to the rest of the body. The symptoms of measles usually appear about seven to 14 days after a person is infected.

People with measles are usually contagious for four days before the rash starts, the day it first appears and the following four days. Common complications include diarrhea and ear infections. Some people may suffer from severe complications, such as pneumonia (infection of the lungs) and encephalitis (swelling of the brain). Infants, pregnant women and people with weakened immune systems are more at risk of complications from measles.

Vaccination is the best protection from measles. Two doses of the MMR (measles, mumps and rubella) vaccine are about 97 percent effective at preventing a person from contracting the disease if exposed to it.

For more information about measles, visit the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's website.

Source: Wake County

 

Categories: Health

Comments

comments