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Famous Bonobo Conservationist to Speak at Museum

August 20, 2012 9:24 am
Written by: Odile Fredericks

Was there someone in your childhood who captured your imagination? For me, that person was a trapeze artist I saw performing when the circus came to town. For years after, I dreamed of a career spent flying high above the rink. This Tuesday, tweens and teens interested in the natural world will have a chance to be inspired by another star, Claudine Andre, a world-renowned conservationist who founded the world's only sanctuary for bonobos, great apes who face extinction.

Andre, whose life story seems to come straight from a compelling movie, will speak at a free lecture at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences at 7 p.m. in the Main Auditorium at 11 West Jones St., in downtown Raleigh. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. for her talk on "Protecting Bonobos: Rescue, Rehabilitation and Conservation Education in the Democratic Republic of Congo."

A zoo volunteer, Andre's life was changed in 1993, after she met an injured baby bonobo at the Kinshasa zoo. Although the creature had little hope of surviving, Andre was determined to save it, and embarked on a path that led to her founding the Lola ya Bonobo ("paradise for bonobos"), in 2002. The sanctuary is now home to 62 bonobos that live in 86 forested acres just outside of Congo's capital, Kinshasa.

Bonobos are disappearing from the planet. According to museum estimates, only between 5,000 and 50,000 remain in the wild, and they all live in the Congo. They face habitat loss and are killed for meat. Many infants are sold as pets or for use in witchcraft. View a video of the bonobos' plight, narated by Andre.

Andre has been working to educate the Congolese about the bonobo as a unique, endangered species, to promote their welfare and protect their future. For her work, she has been awarded the National Order of Merit by France and the Prince Laurent Prize of the Environment by Belgium.

Some information provided by the N.C. Museum of Natural Sciences



When last did you head out with your spouse or meet up with a close friend, just the two of you? The perfect opportunity to escape for a little grown-up time is coming during Downtown Raleigh Restaurant Week, which runs Monday, Aug. 20 through Sunday, Aug. 26. Restaurant Week offers a chance to sample cuisines from around the world. Learn more in Downtown Raleigh Restaurant Week Offers Savings, Delicious Escape.




Was there someone in your childhood who captured your imagination? For me, that person was a trapeze artist I saw performing when the circus came to town. For years after, I dreamed of a career spent flying high above the rink. This Tuesday, tweens and teens interested in the natural world will have a chance to be inspired by another star, Claudine Andre, a world-renowned conservationist who founded the world's only sanctuary for bonobos, great apes who face extinction.

Andre, whose life story seems to come straight from a compelling movie, will speak at a free lecture at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences at 7 p.m. in the Main Auditorium at 11 West Jones St., in downtown Raleigh. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. for her talk on "Protecting Bonobos: Rescue, Rehabilitation and Conservation Education in the Democratic Republic of Congo."

A zoo volunteer, Andre's life was changed in 1993, after she met an injured baby bonobo at the Kinshasa zoo. Although the creature had little hope of surviving, Andre was determined to save it, and embarked on a path that led to her founding the Lola ya Bonobo ("paradise for bonobos"), in 2002. The sanctuary is now home to 62 bonobos that live in 86 forested acres just outside of Congo's capital, Kinshasa.

Bonobos are disappearing from the planet. According to museum estimates, only between 5,000 and 50,000 remain in the wild, and they all live in the Congo. They face habitat loss and are killed for meat. Many infants are sold as pets or for use in witchcraft. View a video of the bonobos' plight, narated by Andre.

Andre has been working to educate the Congolese about the bonobo as a unique, endangered species, to promote their welfare and protect their future. For her work, she has been awarded the National Order of Merit by France and the Prince Laurent Prize of the Environment by Belgium.

Some information provided by the N.C. Museum of Natural Sciences



When last did you head out with your spouse or meet up with a close friend, just the two of you? The perfect opportunity to escape for a little grown-up time is coming during Downtown Raleigh Restaurant Week, which runs Monday, Aug. 20 through Sunday, Aug. 26. Restaurant Week offers a chance to sample cuisines from around the world. Learn more in Downtown Raleigh Restaurant Week Offers Savings, Delicious Escape.



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